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Frøya


Frøya in Norway Frøya municipality coat of arms

Population:
4,634

Areal:
241,3 km2


Frøya Local Directory


Accommodation, Businesses and more pictures from Frøya

Frøya is outermost island off the coast of Trøndelag. The total size of the Frøya muncipality is 241,3 km2, which covers the main island of Frøya and more than 5400 smaller islands, islets and skerriesFrøya has approximately 4.700 inhabitans. The largest villages on the island are Sistranda in the east and Titran in the west. The highest point above sea level is Bremnestua (74 metres), located in the northwestern part of the island. The village of Sistranda is the administrative center. Other villages include Hammarvika, Titran, Sula, and Mausund. The main island of Frøya is connected to neighboring Hitra by the Frøya Tunnel which goes under the Frøyfjorden. The tunnel is the world´s deepest tunnel.

The main industry on Frøya is fish farming. Frøya has developed into one of Norway´s foremost aquacultural municipalities with all its fish farming and related businesses. Frøya is the biggest fishing community in Sør Trøndelag. Today´s business consists in the greatest degree of aquaculture and wild sheep. Along with the neighboring community and the neighboring island of Hitra has a large proportion of all farmed salmon production in Norway. Salmon farming in the sea at Lerøy. One hundred and eighty fishermen are dependent on fish as their main source of income. In agriculture there are active farmers that keep livestock.

The municipality of Frøya has many small fishing communities on small islands in the ocean such as Mausundvær, Bogøyvær, and Sula, with Mausund being the largest of these with a population of approximately 270. Other small islands such as Froan and Halten. Many of these islands are home to lighthouses such as Halten lighthouse, Finnvær lighthouse, Vingleia lighthouse, Sula lighthouse, and Sletringen lighthouse.

Most of the people on Frøya live between Flatvalsundet and Svellingen. The rest of the population live spread throughout the island; often near the sea. The landscape of Frøya is typically open, virtually treeless and relatively flat. The highest point of elevation on the island is only 75 metres above sea level. The characteristic terrain on Frøya can be described as low lying hills, marshland an many lakes.

Though heather and grass are the dominating vegetation in this peaty moorland, all other vegetation in this purple landscape of common, white and bell heather is influenced by the surrounding sea. Here and there you can see a few leaf trees like rowan, aspen, birch and willows, but there are no evergreeen forests on Frøya.

However, there are a few places you will find small wooded aresas, but these are planted trees like pine and spruce. Frøya is a resting, nesting and wintering area for many kinds of sea-birds: seagulls, cormorants, ducks and sea eagles. There is also small game like: mink, otter, hare and a growing number of deer. Furthermore, in the surrounding sea there are a lot of seals.

Three fish hooks made out of bones in the muncipal coat of arms bear proof of a traditional fishery. Fishing has been, and still is a main source of income for many people on Frøya.

FRØYA TUNNEL

The Frøya Tunnel is a undersea tunnel connecting the municipalities of Frøya and Hitra. The tunnel is located about 4 kilometres south of Sistranda. The 5.305 metre long road tunnel reaches a depth of 164 metres below sea level. It begins in Hammarvika in Frøya and travels south under the Frøyfjorden to the island of Dolmøya in Hitra.

SISTRANDA

The main municipal center area Sistranda. The county administration and state offices are also found in Sistranda, as well as the new library, and the elementary and junior high school, which has recently been renovated and added onto. In Sistranda, there is also an advanced secondary school with an extensive curriculum. There is also a commercial education center for adults and the business community. Furthermore, the public indoor swimming pool in Sistranda has just been renovated. In addition to the swimming pool, there is therapy pool and a new public hall for cultural/athletic activities.

FLATVAL

A holdiday place with approximately 200 inhabitants. There are cabin and boat rentals. There is also a fish net factory. Approximately 500 meters after the ferrylanding, there is a turn-off on the road to Titran (29 km) or one can drive straight on to Nord-Dyrøy (24 km). There is a small 800 metres asphalt airstrip (Frøya Airstrip) north of Flatval.

FRØYA BYGDETUN

A small house from the 17th century, with a boathouse and different original artifacts. Contact "Kystmuseet i Sør-Trøndelag" for guided tour.

HAMARVIK

A community with approximately 500 inhabitants. Hamarvik has a post office, gasoline station, car repair service station and a nursing home.

NORDSKAG

A road cross where one can buy groceries and gas. There is also a tavern and boat rental. The Salmon company SalMar is located here.

TITRAN

The southern most point on Frøya. It is an old fishing village with about 130 inhabitants. On October 13, 1899, 150 fishermen lost their lives in a very heavy storm at sea off the coast of Titran. There is a memorial monument at the chapel in Titran that commemorates those who died. Their names are engraved on the monument. Titran is also known for its experimental wind mill energy production. There are 2 windmills. The tallest windmill is 32 meters high and can produce 4000 kW.

STABBEN FORTRESS

Stabben Fortress is a coastal fortress built during the second world war, by Russian and Serbian prisoners. For a guided tour around the Fortress, please contact the Coastal Museum of South Trøndelag

DYRVIK / NESSET

A small community with a grocery store, post office, guest-house. Marine Harvest employs most of the labour force in Frøya.

SVELLINGEN

Church grounds. The new modern style church was built after the old wooden Gothic church burned in 1984. There is seaweed processing plant in Svellingen.

STRAUMØYBOTN

The road connects several small islands. Straumøya, Auke, Kvaløy, Kvennøya to Dyrøya. Angling is possible from shore in the current off Kvennøya. Dyrøya Grocery store, post office, school, gasoline station, cabins, camping and boat rental. Side roads go to Bonenget / Leirvika, where there are fish processing plants and canneries.

SULA

Sula is an archipelago 15 kilometers out of Frøya, mainly located on the island of Great Sula. From the 35 meter high Sulshaugen, you can look across a huge archipelago and the seasons and the weather has its own charm. Sula with its tight timber house building is really similar a small town there at the edge of the Norwegian Sea. Sula has approximately 90 permanent residents, but has a considerably population growth during the summer.

Sula was formerly an important fishing village, but the last 30 years experienced strong depopulation. Sula lighthouse, which was automated in 1974, testify to the importance the fishing village has had. The first lighthouse is from 1793, while the current is from 1909. It was built on the island´s highest point, Sulshaugen, 35 meters above sea level. Sula has speedboat connections to Mausund, Froan and Halten, as well as Frøya and from there to Trondheim. A ferry connection from Dyrøy on Frøya to Mausund and Sula.

MAUSUND

Mausund consists of several islands and is the outer Trondheimsleia with the ocean right next door. Mausund or Mausundvær, is a village and the island of Frøya. The village Mausund is situated on Måøya and Gårdsøya, but the village is considered the population of little and large Aursøy and Geitøya. Mausundvær is Frøyas and Mid-Norway´s largest fishing village. There are approximately 270 residents, mainly those feeds through traditional fishing. Every year in week 28 arranges every year Utihavet Festival with amongst others great fishing competition directed by the Trondheim Fishing Club. Mausund has speedboat connection to Sula, Froan and Halten, as well as Frøya and from there to Trondheim.

FROAN

Commercial fishing has a long tradition on Frøya, Sula, Mausund and Sørburøy. Norway´s largest national marine park lies here. Sørburøy is the most populous island in Froan. Again, increasing the population in summer time. The island is almost divided in two, and the northern part of the island called North Island. Most of the 40 residents live on the North Island, which also houses the shop, and speedboat quay and fishing quay. Abundance of fish and seals, resources that have meant a lot for coastal populations for thousands of years. Sørburøy is situated in the largest contiguous waters that are protected as a nature reserve in Norway; Froan nature reserve and conservation area. There are restrictions on the freedom of movement on land in certain times of the year. There are boat connections to Sistranda a few times a week, slightly more often in the summer.

Gjæsingen island is characterized by depopulation, but has a vibrant life in the summer months. Gjæsingen island has over 10 permanent residents. Gjæsingen is situated in the largest contiguous waters that are protected as a nature reserve in Norway; Froan nature reserve and conservation area. There are restrictions on the freedom of movement on land in certain times of the year. There is considerable immigration to the island during the summer. There are daily boat connections to Sistranda, and further correspondence to Trondheim and Kristiansund.

Sauøy island is located just north of Sørburøy. The island has six permanent residents. On Sauøy is Froan chapel from 1904. Sauøy is situated in the largest contiguous waters that are protected as a nature reserve in Norway; Froan nature reserve and conservation area. There are restrictions on the freedom of movement on land in certain times of the year. It is run farming operations in the area. On Sauøy is grazing land and cultivated land, and it is run sheep farming. There is considerable immigration to the island during the summer. There are boat connections to Sistranda a few times a week, slightly more often in summer.

BOGØYVÆR

Bogøy or Bogøyvær consists of two islands Bogøy and Smaløy, which are linked with a suspension bridge. Today is the place nearly deserted but less than 20 people are still permanent residents. The fishing village is located north of the island of Frøya and has had a steady decline in population after the Second World War. The school was closed down in 1992, which alone almost halved the population. The village, however, provide both accommodation and guest, but is perhaps best known for land trade at the pier. Bogøya is car-free, and all the "traffic" happens with wheelbarrows on accumulated good paths. Bogøyvær has several cairns and a lookout point, and there are many fine walks, even if the distances, naturally enough, is not so huge. Bogøy has speedboat connection to Sula, Mausund and Frøya. A ferry connection from Dyrøy on Frøya to Mausund and Sula. The communications reaches also Bogøy.

HALTEN

Halten lies 31 nautical mil northeast of Frøya. This is an old fishing village, once inhabited by a thousand fishermen, now long abandoned. There is an old lighthouse (Halten lighthouse), a lot of old boathouses and amazing nature to be found on Halten. The last residents moved from the island in 1989.

HIKING

The terrain on Frøya is excellent for hiking and there are marked trails to small cabins open on the weekends for hikers to rest at and get refreshments.

FISHING

There are 163 fresh water lakes and ponds; many of them have trout in them. Angling is possible from shore in the current off Kvennøya. A boat trip passing all the islands, islets and skerries is an extraordinary experience. Here you have great possibilities to really catch big sized cod, saithe, haddock and different kinds of shellfish. You can also fish from land. The local boat has daily trips to Mausund, Sula and Froan, where there are also possibilities for outdoor activities.

GOLF

Golfclubs in Sør Trøndelag.